Computer Information Systems Curriculum

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General Education Courses:

45 Total credit hours

credit hours

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

3

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

3

Provides a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction.

3

This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology.

3

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

3

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

3

A course designed to prepare math, computer science, and engineering majors for a background in abstraction, notation, and critical thinking for the mathematics most directly related to computer science. Topics include: logic, relations, functions, basic set theory, countability and counting arguments, proof techniques, mathematical induction, combinatorics, discrete probability, recursion, sequence and recurrence, elementary number theory, graph theory, and mathematical proof techniques.

Prerequisites: MATH 1314 College Algebra

3

Understanding music through the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements. Illustrated with audio recordings and live performances. (Does not apply to a music major degree).

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

3

(Federal constitution & topics) Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

3

(Texas constitution & topics) Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

3

CIS Core Courses:

57 Total credit hours

credit hours

Overview of computer information systems. Introduces computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources and explores their integration and application in business and other segments in society. The fundamentals of computer problem solving and programming in a higher level programming language may be discussed and applied.

3

This course is an introduction to the program development and design process, including computer-based concepts of problem-solving, structured programming logic and techniques, algorithm development and program design. Topics include program flowcharting, algorithms, input/output techniques, control structures (sequence, selection/decision, and repetition/looping), modularization, procedures/functions/ methods, file handling, control breaks, pseudo-coding, and user documentation. Basic concepts of object oriented programming are also introduced (classes and objects). The course offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course will provide students with a framework to understand the introductory structure and dynamics of Management. In addition, this hands-on class intends to provide students a deep understanding and practical skills to manage an organization in a globalized business environment heavily influenced by digital, interactive, viral, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, Social Media, and High Tech-Innovation Knowledge environments.

3

This course covers the architecture, function, and configuration of computer hardware and networks, along with basic operating system software functions. The students are introduced to network and communications concepts including operational issues surrounding network planning, configuration, monitoring, trouble shooting, and management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course examines the important problems in operating system design and implementation. The operating system provides an established, convenient, and efficient interface between user programs and the bare hardware of the Computer on which they run. Responsible for sharing resources (e.g., disks, networks, and processors), providing common services needed by many different programs (e.g., file service, the ability to start or stop processes, and access to the printer), and protecting individual programs from interfering with one another. Particular emphasis will be given to three major OS subsystems: process management (processes, threads, CPU scheduling, synchronization, and deadlock), memory management (segmentation, paging, swapping), and file systems; and on operating system support for distributed systems, monitoring, trouble shooting, and management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This is an introductory course to database management systems. Examines data structures, file organizations, concepts and principles of database management systems (DBMS), as well as data analysis, database design, data modeling, database management and database implementation. The course provides hands-on experience in database design and implementation through assignments, lab exercises and course projects.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

The course covers ethical style of good writing in Computer Information Systems and Science; the social, legal, philosophical, and economic issues related to Computers that members of a technological society might face in their professional and civic lives; the copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods; the proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and Intranet; the measures, such as passwords or virus detection/prevention, to protect Computer systems and databases from unauthorized use and tampering; and the impact of Computer programming on the World Wide Web (WWW) community.

3

The course covers the introduction to programming and scripting concepts, using JavaScript as the catalyst for learning client-side scripting. Topics include: JavaScript and Dynamic HTML for interactivity · Forms and introductory data processing.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1302 Programming Logic and Design

3

This course will help the student understand the process by which a data warehouse system is designed and developed. The student will get acquainted with OLAP models and their differences with standard OLTP models. Students will learn concepts, tools, and technologies associated with modeling, design, implementation, and management of data warehouses.

Prerequisites: BCIS 2308 Data and Information Management

3

An introduction to the advanced design and analysis of computer communication networks. Topics include application layer protocols, internet protocols, network interfaces, local and wide area networks, wireless networks, bridging and routing, and current topics. Topics include history, media, hardware, software, standards, networks, analysis and design, distributed processing and network management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 2306 Fundamentals of Network Systems

3

A study of the systematic analysis, design, and implementation of software systems with special emphasis on the processes and skills used in the first four stages of the System Development Life Cycle. Traditional and current methodologies, including Computer aided analysis and design tools will be considered. Topics will be approached through project – oriented cases and projects, which integrate theory and practical application.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

In this course, particular emphasis will be placed on the issues associated with the successful completion of a project, including defining, scheduling, and monitoring project activities; interacting with clients in interviews and project reviews; and managing client expectations. The rapidly changing field of information technology requires a solid knowledge foundation. Reviews contemporary information technology management and the relevant issues of effective management of the information service activities.

Prerequisites: BMGT 1301 Introduction to Management

3

This course outlines best practices for the information security goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability; explain ethical practices; define vocabulary/terminology related to information security; explain the importance of planning and administrative controls; identify security threats, vulnerabilities, and counter-measures; and identify procedures for security risk management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course covers a series of current cloud computing technologies, including technologies for infrastructure as a Service, Platform as a Service, Software as a Service, and Physical Systems as a Service. For different layers of the cloud technologies, practical solutions using real world examples as well as theoretical solutions are introduced. Highly project oriented, involving hands-on exploration of existing technologies as well as development of new technologies.

Prerequisites: BCIS 2307 Operating Systems

3

This course will introduce the UNIX operating system, discuss UNIX commands, the file system, text editors, the UNIX shell, and shell scripts. The primary focus will be on command line usage. Covers the history, kernel, file systems, shells and user utilities. Also introduces students to the fundamentals of shell programming, processes, communications, and basic security.

Prerequisites: BCIS 2307 Operating Systems

3

This course will concentrate on normal tasks of a system administrator to include system backup and file maintenance, Linux server maintenance and set up. Overview of integration of files and directories, shell scripting and systems programming; UNIX tools; UNIX internals; file systems, process structure. Using the system call interface and Inter-process communication.

Prerequisites: BCIS 4304 Introduction to UNIX

3

This course explores organizational and managerial issues relevant to planning and conducting IT audit and control activities. Covers the role of the IS auditor, the IS audit functions, and the anatomy of controls in an information systems environment. Access to systems, resources, and data audit controls. Access to IT performance design, placement, and quality of controls. Understand some of the basic theory underlying computer security policies, models, and problems.

3

In this Capstone, students will develop the proposal for the Capstone Project, including project design, methods, and procedures using Java programming for specific task. During this course, students will work with their Capstone Committee, completing the project and preparing a written manuscript and oral presentation of the Capstone. This course will culminate in an oral defense of the capstone.

Prerequisites: BCIS 4304 Introduction to UNIX

3

A course consists of internship with IT related companies. Work experience is cooperatively planned by the department and employer to fulfill the student’s objectives. Weekly conferences, assignments, and reports required. Students are expected to apply classroom and laboratory concepts and principles in an industry work environment. In this course, students are expected to establish goals by working with supervision to define work objectives for the internship experience. They are also expected to demonstrate time and project management skills by completing the work objectives within the specified time limits.

Prerequisites: BCIS 4362 CAPSTONE 1

3

Choose Concentration:

18 Total credit hours

credit hours

18