Computer Information Systems AS Curriculum

General Education Courses:

27 Total credit hours

credit hours

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

3

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

3

Provides a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction.

3

This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology.

3

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

3

CIS Core Courses:

24 Total credit hours

credit hours

Overview of computer information systems. Introduces computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources and explores their integration and application in business and other segments in society. The fundamentals of computer problem solving and programming in a higher level programming language may be discussed and applied.

3

This course is an introduction to the program development and design process, including computer-based concepts of problem-solving, structured programming logic and techniques, algorithm development and program design. Topics include program flowcharting, algorithms, input/output techniques, control structures (sequence, selection/decision, and repetition/looping), modularization, procedures/functions/ methods, file handling, control breaks, pseudo-coding, and user documentation. Basic concepts of object oriented programming are also introduced (classes and objects). The course offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course will provide students with a framework to understand the introductory structure and dynamics of Management. In addition, this hands-on class intends to provide students a deep understanding and practical skills to manage an organization in a globalized business environment heavily influenced by digital, interactive, viral, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, Social Media, and High Tech-Innovation Knowledge environments.

3

This course covers the architecture, function, and configuration of computer hardware and networks, along with basic operating system software functions. The students are introduced to network and communications concepts including operational issues surrounding network planning, configuration, monitoring, trouble shooting, and management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course examines the important problems in operating system design and implementation. The operating system provides an established, convenient, and efficient interface between user programs and the bare hardware of the Computer on which they run. Responsible for sharing resources (e.g., disks, networks, and processors), providing common services needed by many different programs (e.g., file service, the ability to start or stop processes, and access to the printer), and protecting individual programs from interfering with one another. Particular emphasis will be given to three major OS subsystems: process management (processes, threads, CPU scheduling, synchronization, and deadlock), memory management (segmentation, paging, swapping), and file systems; and on operating system support for distributed systems, monitoring, trouble shooting, and management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This is an introductory course to database management systems. Examines data structures, file organizations, concepts and principles of database management systems (DBMS), as well as data analysis, database design, data modeling, database management and database implementation. The course provides hands-on experience in database design and implementation through assignments, lab exercises and course projects.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

The course covers ethical style of good writing in Computer Information Systems and Science; the social, legal, philosophical, and economic issues related to Computers that members of a technological society might face in their professional and civic lives; the copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods; the proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and Intranet; the measures, such as passwords or virus detection/prevention, to protect Computer systems and databases from unauthorized use and tampering; and the impact of Computer programming on the World Wide Web (WWW) community.

3

The course covers the introduction to programming and scripting concepts, using JavaScript as the catalyst for learning client-side scripting. Topics include: JavaScript and Dynamic HTML for interactivity ยท Forms and introductory data processing.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1302 Programming Logic and Design

3

Electives - Complete 3 of the following:

9 Total credit hours

credit hours

Choose from three of the below CIS Elective courses to complete your CIS Elective requirements:

BCIS 1305 – Business Computer Applications
COSC 1301 – Introduction to Computing
COSC 2303 – Introduction to Digital Foresnics
COSC 2304 – Security Policy Analysis, HIPPA, and Implementation
BHIM 1310 – Principles of Health Information Management
BHIM 1311 – Fundamentals of Health Information Systems
BHIM 1301 – Introduction and Technical Aspects of Health Information Management
BHIM 2310 – Departmental Management
BHIM 2311 – Management of Health Information Management Systems
HITT 1301 – Health Data Content and Structure
HITT 1311 – Electronic Medical Records Systems

For more information on the CIS Elective courses, please see the following link:

CIS Elective Course Descriptions

9