Anatomy Curriculum

General Education Communication:

6 Total credit hours

credit hours

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

General Education Mathematics:

6 Total credit hours

credit hours

Choose from two of the below courses to complete your Mathematics Requirement:

MATH 1314 – College Algebra
MATH 1316 – Trigonometry
MATH 1325 – Calculus for Business and Social Sciences
MATH 1342 – Elementary Statistical Methods I

For more information on the math courses, please see the following link:

Math Course Descriptions

6

General Education Natural Sciences:

6 Total credit hours

credit hours

Choose two of the following courses Biology, Physics, Kinesiology, Chemistry, Exercise Physiology, or Other

6

Social & Behavioral Sciences:

9 Total credit hours

credit hours

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

3

Choose from one of the below courses to complete your Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement:

Psychology
Human Growth Sociology
or Other

3

Humanities:

6 Total credit hours

credit hours

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Understanding music through the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements. Illustrated with audio recordings and live performances. (Does not apply to a music major degree).

3

Computer Literacy:

6 Total credit hours

credit hours

Overview of computer systems—hardware, operating systems, the Internet, and application software including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current topics such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other interdisciplinary settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student’s major field of study in business or computer science.

3

Overview of computer information systems. Introduces computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources and explores their integration and application in business and other segments in society. The fundamentals of computer problem solving and programming in a higher level programming language may be discussed and applied.

3

Natural Sciences Foundation:

32 Total credit hours

credit hours

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 1311 General Chemistry I Lecture and
1111 General Chemistry I Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): High School Algebra or equivalent academic preparation

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 1312 General Chemistry II Lecture and
1112 General Chemistry II Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I (Lecture and Laboratory) or equivalent

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of BIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology I (lecture) and BIOL 2101 Anatomy and Physiology I (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of BIOL 2302 Anatomy and Physiology II (lecture) and BIOL 2102 Anatomy and Physiology II (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of CHEM 2323 (lecture) and CHEM 2123
(lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1412 General Chemistry II (Lecture and Laboratory)

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of CHEM 2325 (lecture) and CHEM 2125
(lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 Organic Chemistry (Lecture and Laboratory)

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of PHYS 2325 University Physics I Lecture
and PHYS 2125 University Physics I Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 1316 Trigonometry or equivalent

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 2326 University Physics II Lecture and
2126 University Physics II Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2425 Physics I

4

Anatomy Core:

50.5 Total credit hours

credit hours

Biology of Cells and Tissues supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to provide the student a sound foundation in the way cellular components of different organ systems are combined to produce coordinated function. The course requires the students to develop conceptual skills to visualize the functions of individual components and coordinate them with the overall function of an organ. The course presents the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues organs and organ systems in the human body and correlates these structures with their various functions. The unity of the human body is examined beginning first at the cellular level with a study of the basic life processes of cells including cell structure and function. Emphasis is given to growth, maintenance, energetics, and membrane transport, as well as to how information that is used to run the cell is stored and expressed. Secondly, the manner in which different kinds of cells and their products are organized into the basic tissues are examined, and thirdly the organization of tissues within the various organs and organ systems are studied with an emphasis on the inter-relationship between the structure and function of tissues. At each step, emphasis is placed on the necessity of proper function of each component to the well-being of the whole. Reference is made to the impact of lifestyle choices (diet, activity, etc.) on the structure and function of individual components. The course consists of both lecture and laboratory sessions. In the lecture information is presented in sufficient depth and sufficient detail to support basic working concepts of structure and function. The laboratory sessions are used to help the student visualize the concepts obtained from the lectures or assigned readings and to help them apply the information obtained from these sources. This course provides a foundation for the study of biochemistry and physiology as well as illustrating the cellular organization of systems studied in anatomy.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

4

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the freshman student a sound educational foundation in human embryology and anatomy using a systems approach and will be presented in a lecture/lab format. The course requires that student’s research outside sources to gain insight into the concepts presented. The course will introduce embryological and anatomical concepts whose understanding is absolutely essential to continuing on in gross anatomy and to become a successful Chiropractor. Each section in anatomy is preceded by the embryological development of that area or system. Areas of emphasis include anatomic terminology, fertilization and implantation, embryological development, osteology, arthrology, myology, neurology and the cardiovascular system. Students are encouraged to help each other in class during the “stop and reflect” sessions which promote the concepts of service and group interaction. The main body of information will be presented in a lecture format supported by self-paced labs using models and student partners to emphasize the anatomical features and topographical land marks.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

5

This course is an intensive study of human gross anatomy and its correlations to clinical chiropractic and wellness. The intent of the clinical correlation is to demonstrate the importance of anatomical knowledge to the practice of chiropractic. The focus of Human Gross Anatomy I includes the subjects of Back, Thorax, Neck and Head regions. The laboratory component of this course is done by human dissection.

Prerequisites: BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

5.5

The topics considered in this lecture / laboratory course are centered on the basic neuroanatomical and neurophysiological principles essential to establishing a foundation of knowledge related to the human nervous system. The development, differentiation, and histology of the nervous system will be studied. The external and internal configuration of the spinal cord, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral hemispheres will be discussed. There will be considerable discussion of the neurocircuitry within these regions. Spinal cord pathways along with pathway lesions will be emphasized. The special sensory systems will be addressed from peripheral receptors to central neural pathways. Clinical case studies will be presented and discussed as often as possible. The laboratory sessions will reinforce the structural and functional relationships of the entire neuraxis from spinal cord to cerebral hemispheres.
In this course the fundamental principles of the discipline are taught. This information is needed to form a strong intellectual foundation for further study of the subject and its clinical applications.

Prerequisites: BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II, BASC 5303 Physiology II

5

This course focuses on the recognition and understanding of normal images, variations of normal and congenital anomalies of the neuro musculoskeletal structures of the axial and appendicular skeleton. Although conventional radiography will be the main imaging modality studied, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging will also be evaluated. An introduction to roentgenometric of the axial and appendicular skeleton, scoliosis and spondylolisthesis will also be provided. Osseous dysplasias will also be studied. We will also cover an introduction to basic principles of radiographic interpretation.

Prerequisites: CLSC 5102 Fundamentals of Diagnostic Imaging, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

4

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Chiropractic wellness is defined as a process of optimizing nervous system function to enhance all bodily systems; an active process employing a set of values and behaviors that promotes health and enhanced quality of life. Many factors affect wellness, including exercise, diet, rest, environmental and genetic factors. Knowledge of Biochemistry aids in this mission by teaching the student how the human body operates biochemically and in providing an understanding of basic nutrition necessary to human wellness.

This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry, which focuses upon the major macromolecules and chemical properties of living systems. Primary topics include basic concepts on the physical properties of water, pH, and buffers; basic organic chemistry and importance of functional groups in biomolecules; structure and function of amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics, general properties and regulation; cellular signaling mechanisms; bioenergetics; the structure, function and metabolism of carbohydrates; hormonal regulation of metabolism; fundamental of molecular biology: DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Emphasis is placed on using biochemistry in the process of clinical problem solving.

This course will prepare the student for a large number of other courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic, including Biochemistry II, Physiology I and II, General and Systems Pathology, Pharmacology/Toxicology, Clinical Nutrition, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

3

Basic physiological principles that apply to normal body function will be explored by an in-depth examination of the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms. In this part of the physiology sequence, skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle anatomy, excitation – contraction coupling, mechanical function, and

233

fiber types, and function are covered. In addition, the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems are covered in part of the physiology sequence. It is important to realize that students will learn better if they know the relation of this course to the curriculum to other courses and disciplines. The course will prepare the student for a number of courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic, including Physiology II, General and Systems Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis. The material covered in this course comprises approximately 50% of Part I boards and also is a component of Part II boards.

Prerequisites: BASC 5101 Biology of Cells and Tissues, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

5

Basic physiological principles that apply to normal body function will be explored by an in-depth examination of the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms. In this part of the physiology sequence, the physiological mechanisms that regulate the renal, digestive, and endocrine, systems, as well as exercise, acid-base and temperature regulation are covered in part of the physiology sequence. It is important to realize that students will learn better if they know the relation of this course to the curriculum to other courses and disciplines. The course will prepare the student for a number of courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic including, General and Systems Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis. The material covered in this course comprises approximately 50% of Part I boards.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I

5

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Microbiology is a six credit hour lecture/laboratory course. Microbiology is the study of microorganisms further defined as the branch of biology focused on microorganisms and the effects they have on other living organisms. Microorganisms include bacteria, fungi, viruses, rickettsia, protozoa, and helminthes. Topics include growth, reproduction, nutrition, genetics, infectious processes, defense mechanisms, immunology, and control of microorganisms, emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and development of resistance to antimicrobial chemicals. Laboratory exercises develop fundamental skills in aseptic technique, microscopy, pure culture study, and the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

Prerequisites: BASC 5101 Biology of Cells and Tissues

6

This course is an introduction to the science of Pathology. The basic principles of pathology will be presented with an emphasis on understanding the mechanism of development of the disease process. The general cellular and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of disease will be introduced, with an emphasis on the fact that the pathological process is not a new entity but a misapplication of the normal processes already encountered.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I, BASC 5205 Microbiology/Immunology, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

3

This course is an intensive study of human gross anatomy and its correlations to clinical chiropractic and wellness. The intent of the clinical correlation is to demonstrate the importance of anatomical knowledge to the practice of chiropractic. The focus of Human Gross Anatomy II includes the subjects of Upper Extremity, Abdomen, Pelvis, and Lower Extremity regions. The laboratory component of this course is done by human dissection.

Prerequisites: BASC 5202 Gross Anatomy I

5