Psychology BS Curriculum

General Education Courses:

30 Total credit hours

credit hours

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

3

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

3

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

3

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

(Federal constitution & topics) Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

3

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

3

This course is an introduction to Biology. Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

Overview of computer systems—hardware, operating systems, the Internet, and application software including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current topics such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other interdisciplinary settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student’s major field of study in business or computer science.

3

Interdisciplinary Studies:

18 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course introduces the major areas of public health, epidemiology, health care management, environmental health, social-behavioral health, and health informatics. Students will interpret and analyze a variety of demographic and epidemiological information as they impact a given community.

3

This course emphasizes a holistic approach to health and covers topics such as nutrition, physical activity, stress, and the influence of socio-economic and environmental factors on all aspects of health and well-being.

3

This course will provide an introduction to human nutrition. Students will be Instructed in the function and requirements of all nutrients. Emphasis is placed on the nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite(s): None

3

The course will examine the principles of ethics as it applies to ethical decision-making by leaders in healthcare administration. Students will learn to draw on ethical principles and virtues, promote moral reflection in the context of contemporary health-care challenges, and utilize caring and empathy to make complex ethical decisions.

3

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to principles and methods of epidemiology. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles and methods of public health epidemiology including the biological, behavioral, sociocultural and environmental factors associated with the etiology and distribution of health and disease.

3

This course is designed to introduce students to concepts fundamental to the understanding of human health behavior. Students will learn the different theories of health promotion, implementation, and evaluation. There will be an emphasis on determinants of health behavior and techniques used by health professionals to promote health.

3

Lower Division Required Courses:

24 Total credit hours

credit hours

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics,correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

3

The diversity and classification of life will be studied, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will be given to cell biology, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.

3

This course presents an experimental and theoretical approach to the study of learning and cognition to
include problems, methods and content in the area of learning. Emphasis will be placed on attention,
memory, organization of knowledge and problem solving across cultures.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

Theories, classifications, and research issues relevant to understanding human Psychopathology,
including clinical syndromes and theories of pathology. Topics in Abnormal Psychology, from a
multicultural perspective, shall be discussed to help students to enlarge their multicultural views.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

This course provides and overview of theories, research and contemporary issues in the scientific study of human sexual behavior and experience.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 General Psychology

3

A study of the influence of people on each other’s behavior, including social influence and social interaction.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 General Psychology

3

This course provides an introduction to the science related to happiness, well-being, flourishing and the
positive aspects of human experience. Students will gain an understanding of what contributes to wellbeing
and how to build the enabling conditions of a life worth living.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

Upper Division Required Courses:

48 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course provides an overview of the principles of substance‐related addictions and the processes and mechanisms that underlie addiction. Students will be introduced to the epidemiology and developmental course of addiction, risk and protective influences that act on the course of addiction and its adverse health consequences. Both genetic and environmental underpinnings will be discussed.

Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 General Psychology

3

This course will provide a detailed understanding of neurons and the functional role of different aspects
of the human nervous system. A survey of topic areas relevant to psychology and neuroscience related
disciplines will also be included
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2301
Cross-listed: BASC 6105

3

This course investigates the impact of motivation and personality traits on performance. The selection
of topics combines elements that the prevalent motivation and personality theories have in common,
thereby promoting research from different theoretical perspectives.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2301

3

This course examines current theory and research on self-regulatory and adaptational processes with a
focus on the resources, strategies, goals, emotions, and social processes implicated in coping with
chronic illness and other stressors.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2301

3

This course focuses on the scientific methods used in psychological research, and how research in psychology is planned, carried out, communicated and critiqued. Students will gain an understanding of designing, collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data using examples from a variety of specialty areas in psychology.

3

This course is an introduction to experimental methodology in psychology. Topics will include the formation of testable hypotheses, the selection and implementation of appropriate procedures, the statistical description and analysis of experimental data, and the interpretation of results. Articles from the experimental journals and popular literature will illustrate and interrelate these topics and provide a survey of experimental techniques and content areas.

3

This course is an exploration of how psychology, the science of behavior and mental processes, is
applied in the workplace. The focus in this course will be on industrial and organizational psychology,
specifically job analysis, description, and evaluation; employee selection; performance evaluation;
motivation; job satisfaction; leadership; and group and team development. The course will include
reading, writing, discussion, exercises, and research.
Prerequisite(s): None
Cross-listed: BUSI 6301

3

In this course, students will study how cultural differences combine with perspectives in psychology and anthropology to understand pattern of beliefs, behavior, and social institutions. Students will learn how these patterns compare and contrast to those of other cultural groups, and how cultural differences appear both between and within societies.

3

This course focuses on the scientific study of how psychology influences sports, athletic performance, exercise, and physical activity. Students will gain insight on how psychologists’ coach professional athletes to improve performance and increase motivation.

3

This course will examine how observers perceive their environment through sensory information with an emphasis on the major sensory systems including vision, audition, spatial orientation, touch, taste, and olfaction Students will understand the underpinnings of the senses and how the brain interprets this information with a primary focus on how we see and hear.

3

This course will explore the interface of psychology and the law, with an emphasis on forensic psychology. Students will explore how human minds interpret incidents differently, and the effects on judicial outcomes.

3

This focus of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the biological, emotional, and environmental aspects that impact childhood development. This course incorporates evidence-based treatment to children experiencing a range of emotional and/or behavioral problems.

3

This course explores biological, psychological, and clinical approaches to understand the biological basis of behavior, including perception, memory, motivation, and emotion.

3

Students will study the factors that contribute to the psychological, sociological, and biological changes that occur during the transitions from childhood to young adulthood.
This course provides an introduction to the psychological research on adolescent growth with emphasis on physical, cognitive, social, emotional, sexual, and moral development.

3

This course focuses on the quantitative and qualitative ways in which people develop from young adulthood through old age, including the changes in physical, mental, social, and emotional functioning associated with the aging process. This course also emphasizes study of the socio-cultural forces that impact adult development, including marriage and family, work, and institutions and cultural practices associated with healthcare and dying.

3

The capstone focuses on the use of skills, methodology, and knowledge acquired throughout the undergraduate curriculum in Psychology. The primary focus of the course is the analysis of scientific literature to formulate a research proposal including thorough review of literature, hypothesis, and methodology. The research proposal will describe contributions to the field of psychology. Prerequisite(s): All core coursework. This course must be taken in final term of enrollment.

3