Integrative Health BS Curriculum

General Education Core Courses:

30 Total credit hours

credit hours

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites:ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

3

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

3

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

3

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Prerequisites:ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

(Federal constitution & topics) Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

3

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

3

This course is an introduction to Biology. Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

Overview of computer systems—hardware, operating systems, the Internet, and application software including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current topics such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other interdisciplinary settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student’s major field of study in business or computer science.

3

Lower Division Required Courses:

27 Total credit hours

credit hours

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of BIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology I (lecture) and BIOL 2101 Anatomy and Physiology I (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of BIOL 2302 Anatomy and Physiology II (lecture) and BIOL 2102 Anatomy and Physiology II (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 1311 General Chemistry I Lecture and
1111 General Chemistry I Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): High School Algebra or equivalent academic preparation

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 1312 General Chemistry II Lecture and
1112 General Chemistry II Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I (Lecture and Laboratory) or equivalent

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of CHEM 2323 (lecture) and CHEM 2123
(lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1412 General Chemistry II (Lecture and Laboratory)

4

Advanced principles of organic chemistry will be studied, including the structure, properties, and reactivity of aliphatic and aromatic organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 Organic Chemistry (Lecture and Laboratory)

3

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of PHYS 2325 University Physics I Lecture
and PHYS 2125 University Physics I Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 1316 Trigonometry or equivalent

4

Interdisciplinary Studies:

20 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course introduces the major areas of public health, epidemiology, health care management, environmental health, social-behavioral health, and health informatics. Students will interpret and analyze a variety of demographic and epidemiological information as they impact a given community.

3

This course emphasizes a holistic approach to health and covers topics such as nutrition, physical activity, stress, and the influence of socio-economic and environmental factors on all aspects of health and well-being.

3

This course will provide an introduction to human nutrition. Students will be Instructed in the function and requirements of all nutrients. Emphasis is placed on the nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite(s): None

3

The course will examine the principles of ethics as it applies to ethical decision-making by leaders in healthcare administration. Students will learn to draw on ethical principles and virtues, promote moral reflection in the context of contemporary health-care challenges, and utilize caring and empathy to make complex ethical decisions.

3

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to principles and methods of epidemiology. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles and methods of public health epidemiology including the biological, behavioral, sociocultural and environmental factors associated with the etiology and distribution of health and disease.

3

This course is designed to introduce students to concepts fundamental to the understanding of human health behavior. Students will learn the different theories of health promotion, implementation, and evaluation. There will be an emphasis on determinants of health behavior and techniques used by health professionals to promote health.

3

This course is designed to enable the student to recognize and avoid safety hazards; to intelligently assist in case of accident or illness; to develop the necessary skills for immediate and temporary care of a victim. This course prepares students for the First Aid and CPR Certification.

2

Upper Division Required Courses:

42 Total credit hours

credit hours

Students will learn comprehensive approaches in applying functional physical activity to daily life and in making superior wellness choices.  Students will grasp how to educate and empower individuals towards making positive steps in developing a lifelong commitment to fitness and wellness.

3

The history, concepts, and principles of naturopathy are traced from Hippocrates through the 20th century. Fundamental principles of this healing art are discussed in depth.

3

This course will explore the dietary and lifestyle influences on disease. By the end of the course, students will gain knowledge, skills and competency on the association between nutrition, lifestyle choices, and the development and management of chronic disease.

3

This course focuses on the dietary and lifestyle factors that influence the risk of chronic disease. The course topics include obesity, digestive health, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Students will learn how evaluate current research and compare strategies for prevention.

Prerequisites:NUTR 2301 Introduction to Nutrition I – 3 Credit hours

3

An introduction to manual therapies including massage, reflexology, and acupressure. The course provides an overview of each therapy, the principles used in each therapy and the indications and contraindications of each therapy.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

This course presents sport nutrition guidelines to enhance athletic performance. The course content includes energy expenditure during exercise, the use of supplements, and dietary recommendations for athletic training. Students will gain an understanding of exercise physiology and learn how to create a nutrition plan for each sport. (Pre-requisite: Introduction to Nutrition)

3

This course will present various aspects of the foundational concepts necessary to become a successful chiropractor.
Prerequisite(s): Biology of Cells and Tissues
Cross-listed: CLSC 5103

3

An introduction to the study of herbs, ranging from weeds to culinary flavoring, to medicines. It includes the principles of herbal medicine, the properties of herbs, and indications for use of selected herbs.

3

Covers a combination of current and traditional studies on how both internal and external factors may
affect the various systems of the body and negatively impact a person’s physical or mental wellbeing.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

This course covers cultural, environmental, psychosocial, physical, and economic factors affecting dietary intake and nutrition status for the older adult. Students will identify strategies for maintaining and improving mental and physical function in later years through proper nutrition.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

An introduction to the traditional medicine used by the Chinese. This course will explore the philosophy, techniques, and practices used in Chinese medicine.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

This course examines current theory and research on self-regulatory and adaptational processes with a
focus on the resources, strategies, goals, emotions, and social processes implicated in coping with
chronic illness and other stressors.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2301

3

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Herbology and increases the student’s knowledge of selected topics in advanced herbology. Students explore plant constituents in depth including the classes of plant hormones toxins and their roles in plants and humans.

3

Students will demonstrate knowledge learned throughout the program by taking case studies and transforming them into usable information in an appropriate format. Students will also be given the option to complete an internship to meet course requirements.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Integrative Health Major Courses

3