Health Care Management BBA Curriculum

Year 1 Semester 1:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

3

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Year 1 Semester 2:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

3

Provides a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction.

3

This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology.

3

The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value.

3

Year 1 Semester 3:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for MATH 2413, Calculus I.
Prerequisite(s): either of below.

Prerequisites: MATH 1314 College Algebra, MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences

3

Understanding music through the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements. Illustrated with audio recordings and live performances. (Does not apply to a music major degree).

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

3

Year 2 Semester 1:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

(Federal constitution & topics) Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

3

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy.

3

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade.

3

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFR).

3

Year 2 Semester 2:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity’s accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

3

This course covers fundamental concepts in finance and decision-making techniques in corporate financial management. Also included is an overview of financial markets, financial statement analysis, financial planning, time value of money, risk-return relationship and CAPM, security valuation, capital budgeting techniques, cost of capital, debt policy, and related topics.

3

This course is a study of the basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling resources to accomplish organizational goals. The student will learn how to comprehend, apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate the basic principles of the fundamentals of managing contemporary organizations. The student will also learn to apply appropriate management techniques and skills necessary in order to become an effective manager.

3

Explores methods of collecting, analyzing and interpreting data for managerial decision-making. Emphasizes the business applications of hypothesis testing and model building. Prepares students in areas of calculating, formulating and recognizing statistical data for principles of business and healthcare management. Statistical quality control and Lean Six Sigma strategies will be presented. This course includes data presentation, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and skewness; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling methods and sampling distributions; and confidence interval estimation of parameters and tests of hypotheses.

3

Year 2 Semester 3:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course introduces communication skills that are critical to managerial success in business and professional contexts. Students will develop a working knowledge of theory and improve their skills in interpersonal communication, teamwork, and public presentations. Students will also learn to apply appropriate management communication techniques and skills necessary in order to become more effective managers.

3

Introduces such fundamentals as legal rights and social forces in government, business, and society. Areas of study in this course include torts, contracts, employment law, product liability, and consumer protection. Introduces such fundamentals as legal rights and social forces in government, business, and society. Areas of study in this course include torts, contracts, employment law, product liability, and consumer protection.

3

This course is an introduction to the operations and quality management functions. It will focus on the theory, concepts and problem-solving techniques important in operations management and production management. Topics include demand forecasting, capacity management, resource allocation, inventory management, supply chain management, designing for quality, process controls, inspections, testing, acceptance sampling, management controls, and quality information systems, and project management.

3

The Capstone: Strategies and Problems in Management is a capstone project where students integrate and synthesize competencies from across the degree program and thereby demonstrate the ability to participate in and contribute value to their chosen professional field. Students will draw on their broadened awareness of various environmental influences to identify business problems and use management alternatives relating to the strategic planning mode in the creation of a business plan.

3

Year 3 Semester 1:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course provides an overview of information technology and information systems topics from an organizational and managerial perspective. Topics include current information technology types and trends, such as the Internet and its organizational impact; the relationship of technology to organizational strategy, structure, controls, resources, and security; and the ethical and social impacts of information systems, such as privacy, intellectual property rights, accountability and quality of life. Emphasis will be placed on the user’s role in developing information systems, ethical and management challenges and the uses of IT to create competitive advantages for an organization and decision-making.

3

This course focuses on application of marketing concepts, practices, and activities performed by marketing managers. It includes evaluation of marketing opportunities and marketing planning in a practical strategic framework, product development/management, price setting and management; basic promotional concepts, establishing and managing distribution channels.

3

This course provides students with an introduction to the various aspects of healthcare leadership functions in health care facilities. Attention to areas concerning the operational aspects of clinical and administrative service planning and delivery, accounting and finance, human resources, service delivery will be the focus of the learning concepts.

3

Students will examine the past and current political structure of the U.S. health care system. The processes involved in the development, planning, execution, and oversight of health care policy at national, government, state, and local levels will be discussed.

3

Year 3 Semester 2:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course will provide an overview of personnel management within health care organizations. Students will develop an understanding of healthcare human resource functions and workforce planning regarding recruitment and retention, selection, job description development, benefits, salary planning, training, performance and disciplinary activities.

3

Knowledge of evidence –based methods of practice will be developed in this course. An understanding of how to evaluate and assess best practices through the review of research to implement appropriate intervention practices will be the focus.

3

This course will introduce the concept of behavioral theories that frame health care organizations and leadership styles. Topics to be discussed include transformational leadership, situational leadership, and servant leadership.

3

This course will provide an overview of regulatory standards and procedures involved in the delivery of health care services. Topics of discussion will include government quality and safety regulations, standards of professional practice, and disaster preparedness.

3

Year 3 Semester 3:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

Students will gain an understanding of how health care insurance in the U.S. is structured to meet the needs of various populations. The concepts behind managed care organizations such as health maintenance organizations, preferred provider organizations, employee provider organizations, private payors and public insurance will be discussed.

3

This course will examine the trends, challenges and policies that exist when managing health care on a global level. The role of health care leadership in addressing major global health issues such as health equity, infectious disease, disease prevention and health promotion, and health reform will be assessed.

3

The focus of this course is centered around the overall improvement and maintenance of quality health care services. Students will be introduced to various methods utilized to evaluate, plan, and improve health care services such as quality improvement tools and evaluation methods. An analysis of risks involved in the implementation of selected modes of delivery of care, and medical error prevention and reduction methods will be included.

3

This course will provide an introduction to the function and structure of health care information systems. Various systems used in the delivery and management of health information such as electronic medical records systems, laboratory information systems, supply chain management systems, and human resources management systems will be reviewed.

3

Year 4 Semester 1:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course will introduce the legal, ethical and moral aspects involved in making sound decisions as a leader in the health care environment. An overview of issues surrounding patient rights, end of life decisions, malpractice, and wrongful death with be addressed.

3

This course will prepare students to appropriately address and meet the needs of patients, family members, and co-workers. A better understanding will be gained of how to communicate in a way that recognizes diversity and shows respect to individual beliefs and cultures.

3

Students should begin the search for a facility to complete their internship experience at the start of their program. The internship will provide students with an opportunity to experience firsthand the responsibilities that are involved in assuming the role of a health care leader. Ideally, students should seek opportunities in their area of interest; however, you are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities that are available for you at any health care facility.

3

Students will demonstrate a well-rounded understanding of knowledge and skills acquired in previous core courses leading up to the completion of their degree program. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a management action planning project aimed at applying skills sets in critical thinking and reasoning to execute strategic development and planning, as well as sound decision-making.

3