General Studies Curriculum

Communication:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

Overview of computer systems—hardware, operating systems, the Internet, and application software including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current topics such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other interdisciplinary settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student’s major field of study in business or computer science.

3

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

3

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Introduces basic human communication principles and theories embedded in a variety of contexts including interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.

3

Mathematics:

12 Total credit hours

credit hours

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

3

In-depth study and applications of trigonometry including definitions, identities, inverse functions, solutions of equations, graphing, and solving triangles. Additional topics such as vectors, polar coordinates and parametric equations may be included.

3

The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value.

3

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

3

Natural & Life Sciences:

14 Total credit hours

credit hours

Provides a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction.

3

This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology.

3

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of BIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology I (lecture) and BIOL 2101 Anatomy and Physiology I (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of BIOL 2302 Anatomy and Physiology II (lecture) and BIOL 2102 Anatomy and Physiology II (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

4

Social & Behavioral Sciences:

15 Total credit hours

credit hours

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

3

(Federal constitution & topics) Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

3

(Texas constitution & topics) Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

3

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

3

Humanities:

6 Total credit hours

credit hours

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Composition I

3

Understanding music through the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements. Illustrated with audio recordings and live performances. (Does not apply to a music major degree).

3

Electives:

18 Total credit hours

credit hours

Choose from 1000 or above level courses not used in General Education Core or choose a specialization area in Anatomy, Business, Health Care, or Information Technology.

18

Information Technology Specialization:

18 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course is an introduction to the program development and design process, including computer-based concepts of problem-solving, structured programming logic and techniques, algorithm development and program design. Topics include program flowcharting, algorithms, input/output techniques, control structures (sequence, selection/decision, and repetition/looping), modularization, procedures/functions/ methods, file handling, control breaks, pseudo-coding, and user documentation. Basic concepts of object oriented programming are also introduced (classes and objects). The course offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course covers the architecture, function, and configuration of computer hardware and networks, along with basic operating system software functions. The students are introduced to network and communications concepts including operational issues surrounding network planning, configuration, monitoring, trouble shooting, and management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This course examines the important problems in operating system design and implementation. The operating system provides an established, convenient, and efficient interface between user programs and the bare hardware of the Computer on which they run. Responsible for sharing resources (e.g., disks, networks, and processors), providing common services needed by many different programs (e.g., file service, the ability to start or stop processes, and access to the printer), and protecting individual programs from interfering with one another. Particular emphasis will be given to three major OS subsystems: process management (processes, threads, CPU scheduling, synchronization, and deadlock), memory management (segmentation, paging, swapping), and file systems; and on operating system support for distributed systems, monitoring, trouble shooting, and management.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

This is an introductory course to database management systems. Examines data structures, file organizations, concepts and principles of database management systems (DBMS), as well as data analysis, database design, data modeling, database management and database implementation. The course provides hands-on experience in database design and implementation through assignments, lab exercises and course projects.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1301 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

3

The course covers ethical style of good writing in Computer Information Systems and Science; the social, legal, philosophical, and economic issues related to Computers that members of a technological society might face in their professional and civic lives; the copyright laws/issues and model ethical acquisition and use of digital information, citing sources using established methods; the proper etiquette and knowledge of acceptable use policies when using networks, especially resources on the Internet and Intranet; the measures, such as passwords or virus detection/prevention, to protect Computer systems and databases from unauthorized use and tampering; and the impact of Computer programming on the World Wide Web (WWW) community.

3

The course covers the introduction to programming and scripting concepts, using JavaScript as the catalyst for learning client-side scripting. Topics include: JavaScript and Dynamic HTML for interactivity · Forms and introductory data processing.

Prerequisites: BCIS 1302 Programming Logic and Design

3

Health Care Specialization:

18 Total credit hours

credit hours

Introduces students to the discipline of public health. It will cover a variety of disciplines to the basic tenets of public health. The course will provide a history of public health, an introduction to the five core disciplines (Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Environmental Health, Social and Behavioral Health, and Health Policy & Management). The course will also cover the role of public health in a global society.

3

Introduction to the concepts of computer technology related to health care and the tools and techniques for collecting, storing, and retrieving health care data. (3 credit Hours).

3

Emphasis is placed on relating course content to lifestyle to foster a better understanding of the major health issues of today. Current issues include, but are not limited to: emotional health, chemical use and abuse, human sexuality, major diseases, physical fitness, nutrition, aging, death and dying.

3

The study of human cultures. Topics may include social organization, institutions, diversity, interactions between human groups, and ethics in the discipline.

3

This course introduces general nutritional concepts in health and disease and includes practical applications of that knowledge. Special emphasis is given to nutrients and nutritional processes including functions, food sources, digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Food safety, availability, and nutritional information including food labels, advertising, and nationally established guidelines are addressed.

3

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.

3

Business Specialization:

18 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course will provide students with a framework to understand the introductory structure and dynamics of Management. In addition, this hands-on class intends to provide students a deep understanding and practical skills to manage an organization in a globalized business environment heavily influenced by digital, interactive, viral, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, Social Media, and High Tech-Innovation Knowledge environments.

3

The main focus of this course is on business applications of software, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, and business-oriented utilization of the Internet.
The designated course must be taken prior to any other HIT core courses

Prerequisites: COSC 1301 Introduction to Computing

3

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy.

3

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade.

3

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFR).

3

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity’s accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

3

Anatomy Specialization:

13 Total credit hours

credit hours

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

3

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.

3

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of PHYS 1301 (lecture) and PHYS 1101 (lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.

Prerequisites: MATH 1314 College Algebra

4

Emphasis is placed on relating course content to lifestyle to foster a better understanding of the major health issues of today. Current issues include, but are not limited to: emotional health, chemical use and abuse, human sexuality, major diseases, physical fitness, nutrition, aging, death and dying.

3