Doctor of Chiropractic Curriculum

Trimester 1:

22.5 Total credit hours

credit hours

Biology of Cells and Tissues supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to provide the student a sound foundation in the way cellular components of different organ systems are combined to produce coordinated function. The course requires the students to develop conceptual skills to visualize the functions of individual components and coordinate them with the overall function of an organ. The course presents the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues organs and organ systems in the human body and correlates these structures with their various functions. The unity of the human body is examined beginning first at the cellular level with a study of the basic life processes of cells including cell structure and function. Emphasis is given to growth, maintenance, energetics, and membrane transport, as well as to how information that is used to run the cell is stored and expressed. Secondly, the manner in which different kinds of cells and their products are organized into the basic tissues are examined, and thirdly the organization of tissues within the various organs and organ systems are studied with an emphasis on the inter-relationship between the structure and function of tissues. At each step, emphasis is placed on the necessity of proper function of each component to the well-being of the whole. Reference is made to the impact of lifestyle choices (diet, activity, etc.) on the structure and function of individual components. The course consists of both lecture and laboratory sessions. In the lecture information is presented in sufficient depth and sufficient detail to support basic working concepts of structure and function. The laboratory sessions are used to help the student visualize the concepts obtained from the lectures or assigned readings and to help them apply the information obtained from these sources. This course provides a foundation for the study of biochemistry and physiology as well as illustrating the cellular organization of systems studied in anatomy.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

4

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the freshman student a sound educational foundation in human embryology and anatomy using a systems approach and will be presented in a lecture/lab format. The course requires that student’s research outside sources to gain insight into the concepts presented. The course will introduce embryological and anatomical concepts whose understanding is absolutely essential to continuing on in gross anatomy and to become a successful Chiropractor. Each section in anatomy is preceded by the embryological development of that area or system. Areas of emphasis include anatomic terminology, fertilization and implantation, embryological development, osteology, arthrology, myology, neurology and the cardiovascular system. Students are encouraged to help each other in class during the “stop and reflect” sessions which promote the concepts of service and group interaction. The main body of information will be presented in a lecture format supported by self-paced labs using models and student partners to emphasize the anatomical features and topographical land marks.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

7

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Chiropractic wellness is defined as a process of optimizing nervous system function to enhance all bodily systems; an active process employing a set of values and behaviors that promotes health and enhanced quality of life. Many factors affect wellness, including exercise, diet, rest, environmental and genetic factors. Knowledge of Biochemistry aids in this mission by teaching the student how the human body operates biochemically and in providing an understanding of basic nutrition necessary to human wellness.

This course provides an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry, which focuses upon the major macromolecules and chemical properties of living systems. Primary topics include basic concepts on the physical properties of water, pH, and buffers; basic organic chemistry and importance of functional groups in biomolecules; structure and function of amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics, general properties and regulation; cellular signaling mechanisms; bioenergetics; the structure, function and metabolism of carbohydrates; hormonal regulation of metabolism; fundamental of molecular biology: DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Emphasis is placed on using biochemistry in the process of clinical problem solving.

This course will prepare the student for a large number of other courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic, including Biochemistry II, Physiology I and II, General and Systems Pathology, Pharmacology/Toxicology, Clinical Nutrition, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

3

This course will present various aspects of the foundational concepts necessary to become a successful chiropractor.

SECTION 1 Basic Principles of Chiropractic Practice

This section will cover chiropractic business procedure, portions of healthcare law including ethics, certain misconduct, and patient confidentiality, and business issues such as defining a mission, creating a budget, and understanding personal credit.

SECTION 2 Chiropractic History & Philosophy

In compliance with the mission of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, this course is structured to provide the freshman chiropractic student with an introduction and orientation to the philosophical basis of chiropractic. This course explores the history of chiropractic, the chiropractic adjustment, and the early pioneers of the profession. Fundamental differences between the chiropractic and allopathic models are addressed, stressing the differences between the mechanistic and vitalistic paradigms. The course also begins with a foundational series on establishing effective study habits, organizational planning, and common sense financial awareness to empower and encourage the student professional as he / she begins their chiropractic career.
Prerequisites(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

4

This course introduces the basic elements of the clinical encounter and the clinical decision-making process. Central to sound clinical decision-making is the use of evidence to inform the clinical reasoning process. Evidence comes in several forms, and each must be critically evaluated to determine its proper weight in decision-making. This course will explore the types of evidence, the methods used in clinical research, and the techniques used to evaluate evidence, building on the concepts of critical thinking introduced elsewhere in the curriculum. Students will conduct searches using Internet search engines and indexed databases and use the results to inform the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for various clinical scenarios. The course culminates in the creation of an evidence-informed public service announcement regarding a clinical condition, which students will present to their peers and other members of the campus community. This course supports the Doctor of Chiropractic program by laying the groundwork for clinical reasoning and equipping students with essential skills for evaluating evidence and using evidence to inform clinical decision-making.
Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

2

Fundamentals of Diagnostic Imaging (FDI) is an introduction to the basic principles that govern diagnostic imaging. It is designed to provide a succinct tutorial in the production of x-rays and acquisition of diagnostic quality images. The course includes discussion regarding the history and discovery of x-rays, as well as, the practical physics behind them. Additional topics include x-ray interactions with matter, x-ray film and screens, film processing, radiation protection and radiobiology. The course concludes with a look at contemporary imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MR), computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

2.5

Trimester 2:

26.5 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course is an intensive study of human gross anatomy and its correlations to clinical chiropractic and wellness. The intent of the clinical correlation is to demonstrate the importance of anatomical knowledge to the practice of chiropractic. The focus of Human Gross Anatomy I includes the subjects of Back, Thorax, Neck and Head regions. The laboratory component of this course is done by human dissection.

Prerequisites: BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

5.5

Basic physiological principles that apply to normal body function will be explored by an in-depth examination of the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms. In this part of the physiology sequence, skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle anatomy, excitation – contraction coupling, mechanical function, and

233

fiber types, and function are covered. In addition, the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems are covered in part of the physiology sequence. It is important to realize that students will learn better if they know the relation of this course to the curriculum to other courses and disciplines. The course will prepare the student for a number of courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic, including Physiology II, General and Systems Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis. The material covered in this course comprises approximately 50% of Part I boards and also is a component of Part II boards.

Prerequisites: BASC 5101 Biology of Cells and Tissues, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

5

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Microbiology is a six credit hour lecture/laboratory course. Microbiology is the study of microorganisms further defined as the branch of biology focused on microorganisms and the effects they have on other living organisms. Microorganisms include bacteria, fungi, viruses, rickettsia, protozoa, and helminthes. Topics include growth, reproduction, nutrition, genetics, infectious processes, defense mechanisms, immunology, and control of microorganisms, emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and development of resistance to antimicrobial chemicals. Laboratory exercises develop fundamental skills in aseptic technique, microscopy, pure culture study, and the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

Prerequisites: BASC 5101 Biology of Cells and Tissues

6

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Chiropractic wellness is defined as a process of optimizing nervous system function to enhance all bodily systems; an active process employing a set of values and behaviors that promotes health and enhanced quality of life. Many factors affect wellness, including exercise, diet, rest, environmental and genetic factors. Knowledge of Biochemistry aids in this mission by teaching the student how the human body operates biochemically and in providing an understanding of basic nutrition necessary to human wellness. This course is designed to give the student a sound fundamental educational base in Biochemistry. This includes a comprehensive consideration of the role of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins and minerals in maintaining a healthy state. It will help students to develop a general foundation for understanding the biochemical basis of human growth, metabolism and disease and acquire the biochemical background required for successful progression in the basic biomedical and clinical sciences. Special emphasis will be placed on, but not limited, to the biochemical basis of metabolism including the biosynthesis and breakdown of lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids, eicosanoids, some important special products derived from amino acids. Mechanisms of action of various nutrient molecules, vitamins, and

234

minerals, and their essential biochemical roles will be explained and emphasized. This will also discuss the deficiencies, toxicities and pathologies associated with vitamin and minerals in our diet.

Prerequisites: BASC 5105 Biochemistry I

3

This course introduces the concept of clinical biomechanics as it applies to the practice of chiropractic. The objective of the course is to gain an understanding of the clinical biomechanics of the spine, pelvis, and extremities as this forms the foundation to be able to scientifically diagnose and apply treatment to correct the vertebral subluxation complex. This course includes the study of procedures used to evaluate normal and abnormal joint dynamics (subluxation) of the spine and pelvis to determine if Chiropractic Manipulative Therapy (CMT) is indicated. The concepts of the subluxation complex and motion and static listing systems are introduced.

Prerequisites: BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

4

Clinical Psychology has three main areas or purposes. The first is learning to use psychological principles in dealing with patients. Crisis intervention, communication skills training, stress reduction and pain management are among the principles included. The second is the recognition of psycho-pathological conditions in order to help the intern with treatment planning and referral. Thirdly, the intern will better understand the influence of the mind/thoughts/emotions on physical health.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5103 Foundations of Chiropractic, CHSC 5104 Introduction to Clinical Reasoning

3

Trimester 3:

26 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course is an intensive study of human gross anatomy and its correlations to clinical chiropractic and wellness. The intent of the clinical correlation is to demonstrate the importance of anatomical knowledge to the practice of chiropractic. The focus of Human Gross Anatomy II includes the subjects of Upper Extremity, Abdomen, Pelvis, and Lower Extremity regions. The laboratory component of this course is done by human dissection.

Prerequisites: BASC 5202 Gross Anatomy I

5

Basic physiological principles that apply to normal body function will be explored by an in-depth examination of the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms. In this part of the physiology sequence, the physiological mechanisms that regulate the renal, digestive, and endocrine, systems, as well as exercise, acid-base and temperature regulation are covered in part of the physiology sequence. It is important to realize that students will learn better if they know the relation of this course to the curriculum to other courses and disciplines. The course will prepare the student for a number of courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic including, General and Systems Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis. The material covered in this course comprises approximately 50% of Part I boards.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I

5

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the student a sound educational foundation in the issues of public health topics. It is a two credit hour course. The core curriculum consists of the basic public health topics: historical perspective of public health, public health organizations their purpose, structure and functions, social and behavioral factors affecting public health, injuries as a community health problem, safety and health in the workplace, environmental factors in disease transmission and inhibition of disease, epidemiology, food microbiology and aquatic microbiology.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I, BASC 5205 Microbiology/Immunology

2

This course is an introduction to the science of Pathology. The basic principles of pathology will be presented with an emphasis on understanding the mechanism of development of the disease process. The general cellular and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of disease will be introduced, with an emphasis on the fact that the pathological process is not a new entity but a misapplication of the normal processes already encountered.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I, BASC 5205 Microbiology/Immunology, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

3

In compliance with the mission of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, this course is structured to provide the chiropractic student with a deeper exploration into the philosophical principles of chiropractic, as well as the principles and philosophy developed by the college founder, Dr. James W. Parker. The core material is presented through the lens of current chiropractic issues and challenges with a primary goal to foster genuine discussion and critical thinking.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5103 Foundations of Chiropractic

2

The most widely utilized, practiced and researched method in chiropractic is a high velocity – low amplitude technique usually referred to as “Diversified”. This course covers the diverseness (both short & long lever, direct & indirect techniques) of its background and represents the student’s first exposure to the primary entity that sets chiropractic apart and makes us unique from other healing arts. This introductory course is divided into lecture and lab time. The greatest emphasis is placed on lab to learn the core skills (biomechanics & ergonomics) necessary to begin to develop a truly individual and unique art form of adjusting (we teach to perfection & test to standard). This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5203 Clinical Biomechanics/Motion Palpation

3

This course presents students with the fundamentals of detecting and correcting extra-spinal subluxations.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5203 Clinical Biomechanics/Motion Palpation

2

This course focuses on the recognition and understanding of normal images, variations of normal and congenital anomalies of the neuro musculoskeletal structures of the axial and appendicular skeleton. Although conventional radiography will be the main imaging modality studied, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging will also be evaluated. An introduction to roentgenometric of the axial and appendicular skeleton, scoliosis and spondylolisthesis will also be provided. Osseous dysplasias will also be studied. We will also cover an introduction to basic principles of radiographic interpretation.

Prerequisites: CLSC 5102 Fundamentals of Diagnostic Imaging, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

4

Trimester 4:

27 Total credit hours

credit hours

The topics considered in this lecture / laboratory course are centered on the basic neuroanatomical and neurophysiological principles essential to establishing a foundation of knowledge related to the human nervous system. The development, differentiation, and histology of the nervous system will be studied. The external and internal configuration of the spinal cord, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral hemispheres will be discussed. There will be considerable discussion of the neurocircuitry within these regions. Spinal cord pathways along with pathway lesions will be emphasized. The special sensory systems will be addressed from peripheral receptors to central neural pathways. Clinical case studies will be presented and discussed as often as possible. The laboratory sessions will reinforce the structural and functional relationships of the entire neuraxis from spinal cord to cerebral hemispheres.
In this course the fundamental principles of the discipline are taught. This information is needed to form a strong intellectual foundation for further study of the subject and its clinical applications.

Prerequisites: BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II, BASC 5303 Physiology II

5

This course is a continuation into the basic principles of pathology as covered in General Pathology. Presentations will include an in-depth discussion into multiple organ systems pathology, with an emphasis on understanding the origins of the pathophysiological disease state. An understanding of the initial factors in the early development of organ dysfunction will lead to a more appropriate intervention by the future health care provider. A philosophical discussion of the benefits of preventive care as it relates to a wellness lifestyle will also be included where appropriate.

Prerequisites: BASC 5306 General Pathology

5

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, of helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the second year student a sound educational foundation in the Gonstead Chiropractic adjusting technique. This course introduces the student to the Full-Spine System of analyzing and adjusting spinal subluxations as developed by Dr. Clarence S. Gonstead. His system of X- ray analysis, philosophy and specific Chiropractic adjusting of the entire spine is presented. The student is introduced to the use of the cervical chair, knee chest table and pelvic bench.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5203 Clinical Biomechanics/Motion Palpation, CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique

2

The most widely utilized, practiced and researched method in chiropractic is a high velocity – low amplitude technique usually referred to as “Diversified”. This course covers the diverseness (both short & long lever, direct & indirect techniques) of its background and represents the student’s first exposure to the primary entity that sets chiropractic apart and makes us unique from other healing arts. This introductory course is divided into lecture and lab time. The greatest emphasis is placed on lab to learn the core skills (biomechanics & ergonomics) necessary to begin to develop a truly individual and unique art form of adjusting (we teach to perfection & test to standard). This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5203 Clinical Biomechanics/Motion Palpation, CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique

2

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Physical Diagnosis is the most fundamental of diagnostic techniques. After an introduction to diagnosis and clinical history taking, the course covers the basic principles and procedures used in physical examination, including inspection, palpation, percussion and instrumentation of the various body systems. Multiple conditions are presented as they relate to chiropractic practice.

Prerequisites: BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II, CHSC 5203 Clinical Biomechanics/Motion Palpation

4

Diagnostic Imaging II (DI2) is the first of two courses focused on the imaging appearance of a variety of pathological aberrations affecting patients. This course will include a high level review of clinical imaging of the musculoskeletal system in various disease states. Lectures are geared toward a practical, problem- solving approach to musculoskeletal conditions and a systematic approach to interpretation of diagnostic imaging studies will be utilized. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between the fundamental histopathology and pathophysiology, the observable changes seen on imaging studies, and clinically relevant physical and biochemical findings. Additionally, the current state-of-the-art clinical practice for musculoskeletal advanced imaging will be included, highlighting the role and applications of such techniques.

Categories of bone disease to be discussed include primary benign and malignant neoplasms of bone of various histological etiologies, metastatic disease of bone, vascular pathologies, nutritional/metabolic and endocrine diseases, osteomyelitis, inflammatory and degenerative arthritic disorders, and autoimmune connective tissue disorders such as systemic lupus and scleroderma. This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service.

Prerequisites: CLSC 5301 Diagnostic Imaging I, BASC 5306 General Pathology

5

This course presents the principles and practice of scientifically based clinical nutrition. Topics discussed include assessment of nutritional status considering nutritional implications of the physical exam, laboratory studies, and more). Topics include macronutrients, micronutrients, phytonutrients, enzymes, antioxidants and other nutrients. Various conditions are discussed with emphasis on understanding that they are different expressions of imbalances and/or dysfunction that are preventable and correctable in many cases. Emphasis is on those conditions likely to be seen in the chiropractic practice that will respond to nutritional intervention thereby increasing the health and wellness of the patients.

Prerequisites: BASC 5303 Physiology II, BASC 5206 Biochemistry II, BASC 5306 General Pathology

4

Trimester 5:

26 Total credit hours

credit hours

Pharmacology / Toxicology is the study of drugs, with special emphasis on drug usage, clinical effects, toxic reactions, and poisoning. This course has been specifically designed and organized so as to introduce students of Parker University, College of Chiropractic to the foundational concepts of Pharmacology and Toxicology. Although chiropractors in Texas do not currently prescribe drugs, the frequency with which their clients may also use prescription and/or on-prescription drugs makes it imperative for the chiropractic clinician to have a sound working knowledge of the more commonly used medicinals.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I

2

This lab is continuation of the core courses of Diversified and Gonstead which make up the foundation of the osseous adjustive techniques of our profession. This lab only course is designed for skill building toward mastery. Varying techniques will be explored along with alternates in patient positioning, doctor positioning, different contact points, variable approach to segmental contact points, contributions from the indifferent hand, combined lined of drive (coupling), and different types of force generation. This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research, and service.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique, CHSC 6101 Gonstead Technique

1

Physiotherapy modalities such as heat, cold, electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, traction, massage and light therapy are healing adjuncts to the chiropractic adjustment. While emphasis is placed on the safe application of these modalities, the course also covers an explanation of the underlying physics of each modality and instructs the student in the static and dynamic neuromuscular relationships that will be the basis of passive and active care therapies in future courses. The course will focus on the rationale and appropriate selection of therapy for selected conditions.

Prerequisites: BASC 6105 Neuroscience, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology

3

This course presents the students with analysis and adjusting procedures using the terminal point drop table, as developed by Dr. J. Clay Thompson. This technique uses specific diagnostic procedures, using leg length checks, specific patient positioning prior to adjustment, and post-adjustment leg checks to determine the proper application of the technique. The student will also be introduced to the proper use of the terminal point table and interpretation of pertinent X-ray findings. This technique will equip the students with the ability to analyze and interpret information obtained through the appropriate materials and Thompson protocol, and to know when and how to apply the accumulated information for favored results. The student is presented with the theory and practice to develop adequate skills in order to be proficient in this technique. The student is also introduced to the proper use of the side posture drop headpiece and its use in the toggle-recoil system of upper cervical adjusting.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique

2

Ob-Gyn course introduces the basic concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions specific to the female patient. The course examines the anatomical and physiological process occurring in pregnancy and childbirth as they are clinically relevant to the practicing chiropractor. Adjusting for the pregnant female will also be discussed. Pediatrics is a primary course in the diagnosis and treatment of physical and psychosocial conditions unique to infants and children. Information on examination and chiropractic adjusting procedures will be discussed.

Prerequisites: BASC 5304 Public Health, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique

4

This is a full-spine technique developed by Dr. W. C. Lee and Dr. A. W. Fuhr. The technique uses a system of analyzing body mechanics for diagnosis and utilizes a small, hand-held instrument called an “Activator” for delivering a precise adjustment to correct subluxations. This technique stresses the necessity of not only knowing when and where to adjust, but also when not to adjust.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique

2

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course introduces students to proper Orthopedic examination procedures and test for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand knee, ankle and foot. It also presents an organized system for approaching Musculoskeletal disorders and introduces students to the necessity of differentially diagnosing between Musculoskeletal disorders and visceral disease processes.

Prerequisites: BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II, CHSC 5203 Clinical Biomechanics/Motion Palpation

3

This course teaches clinical laboratory diagnostic tests and procedures as they relate to the identification and diagnosis of systemic disorders of the human body. This includes blood chemistry, hematology, urinalysis and a variety of other laboratory tests. The course emphasizes laboratory tests that are useful for evaluating health and wellness in the chiropractic practice.

Prerequisites: BASC 5303 Physiology II, BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, BASC 5304 Public Health

4

This course expands on the physical and orthopedic examination courses. Clinical neurology will be presented in a fashion which is pertinent to the practice of chiropractic. Allopathic applications will be given where necessary. Students will be strongly encouraged to build upon information presented in earlier courses such as anatomy, physiology, and the neurosciences. Clinical neurology will require critical analysis and problem solving skill sets. This course will help the student to understand the neurophysiological ramifications of the subluxation complex and the practice of chiropractic. This course also serves to develop the student competency in performing chiropractic neurological evaluations that are essential to clinical practice.

Prerequisites: BASC 6105 Neuroscience, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis

5

Trimester 6:

25 Total credit hours

credit hours

Students may choose from electives that include advanced classes in the core techniques and classes in other techniques. The electives are taught in a hybrid format with the lecture component being delivered on line and the laboratory component delivered face to face and hands on.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique, CHSC 5303 Extra Spinal Analysis & Technique, CHSC 6102 Diversified II Technique, CHSC 6101 Gonstead Technique, CHSC 6206 Thompson Technique, CHSC 6205 Activator I Technique

2

Building upon the concepts learned in PT I, Physiotherapy II focuses on rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. Proprioception and postural training, muscle stretching and strengthening exercises, laser, Graston Technique and trigger point therapy are integrated to mobilize a comprehensive healing response. The Triflex and Janda rehabilitation protocols are taught where appropriate for various conditions.

Prerequisites: CHSC 6207 Physiotherapy I

4

Science and Philosophy of Vertebral Subluxation Complex presents a well-rounded approach to understanding concepts in philosophy and the science of vertebral subluxation complex that supports Parker University, College of Chiropractic’s mission of creating leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness. This course will present the current hypotheses and theories of chiropractic, the basis of chiropractic health care, the causes and effects of subluxation, the mechanism of visceral and somatic symptoms and dysfunctions related to subluxation, and information relative to complications and contraindications to the use of chiropractic adjustments.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5301 Chiropractic Principles/Philosophy, CHSC 6207 Physiotherapy I

4

This lab is continuation of the core courses of Diversified and Gonstead which make up the foundation of the osseous adjustive techniques of our profession. This lab only course is designed for skill building toward mastery. Varying techniques will be explored along with alternates in patient positioning, doctor positioning, different contact points, variable approach to segmental contact points, contributions from the indifferent hand, combined lined of drive (coupling), and different types of force generation. This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research, and service.

Prerequisites: CHSC 6208 Full Spine Adjusting I

1

This course is a general introduction into small business management. It will include the topics related to the disciplines associated with managing a small business including all that is associated with the startup of a small business. Topics include ownership structures; entry into the competitive, economic, and social environment; developing a business plan and associated strategies; marketing and selling the product or service; accounting, finance and financing; tax strategies; operations; risk and insurance; legal issues; ethics; and human resources. Students will analyze and evaluate current chiropractic practices and small businesses in the healthcare field and apply management strategies through individual and group case scenarios in order to be successful small business owners.

Prerequisites: CHSC 6307 Science and Philosophy of the Vertebral Subluxation Complex

3

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to teach the musculoskeletal portion (excluding orthopedics) of the Parker patient assessment procedure which is organized in regional format and sensitive for the relationships between spine and frame asymmetry and relative pain, dysfunction, degeneration, and disorder in the body. This course will utilize evaluation skills such as posture inspection, soft tissue mobility, palpation, range of motion, and fundamental movement assessments to teach proper implementation of skills necessary for clinic entrance, internship, and private practice.

Prerequisites: CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CLSC 6205 Clinical Neurology

2

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the student a sound educational foundation in the development of a differential diagnosis and working diagnosis through the presentation and evaluation of cases and case studies. In addition to the development of working diagnosis the course is designed to discuss basic patient management in preparation for more advanced discussion in the following Patient Management course. This course requires that the student research outside sources to gain insight in the development of critical thinking skills essential for differential diagnosis and patient management. Emphasis will be placed on common conditions the Chiropractor will encounter during practice. The course will introduce a systematic approach to the development of a differential diagnosis using sound reasoning skills that have been gained over the course of the student’s studies. In addition algorithms will be introduced as an aid to performing a diagnosis.

Prerequisites: CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CLSC 6201 Clinical Orthopedics, CLSC 6205 Clinical Neurology, CLSC 6204 Lab Diagnosis, CLSC 6104 Diagnostic Imaging II

5

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the student a sound educational foundation in imaging of the chest, abdomen and internal derangement of joints. The course requires that student to research outside sources to gain insight into the concepts presented. The course will introduce a systematic approach to the interpretation of plain film and advanced imaging of the chest, abdomen and select joints. The understandings of the concepts presented are absolutely essential to become a successful Chiropractor. Areas of emphasis are listed in the learning objectives below. Students are encouraged to help each other in class and lab.

Prerequisites: BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6104 Diagnostic Imaging II, BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II

4

Trimester 7:

26 Total credit hours

credit hours

Documentation for the Chiropractic Practice presents a well-rounded approach to understanding concepts in patient-centered decision-making and documentation that supports Parker University, College of Chiropractic’s mission of creating leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness. This course is intended to prepare the learner with the skills necessary to properly document patient care, in preparation for their clinical experience in the Parker Wellness Clinics and ultimately in their private practice. After learning the basics and processes of clinical documentation via interactive class discussions, the student will further develop those skills through case driven scenarios. Topics will include modern healthcare commerce, claims commerce, case management, coding, fee setting, Medicare, and documentation procedures related to treatment planning, patient financial reporting (billing), treatment records.

Prerequisites: CHSC 6207 Physiotherapy I, CHSC 6307 Science and Philosophy of the Vertebral Subluxation Complex

4

Chiropractic Business Promotion and Leadership Skills is a general introduction into the disciplines of marketing, patient billing, human resources, and effective communication strategies within the chiropractic practice/small business setting. Students will learn important business concepts for use in the chiropractic practice related to proper insurance/cash billing and coding, how effectively market and to monitor the success of the marketing strategies used, staff management (HR) policies and skills, and proper internal and external office communication strategies . Students will learn from real-world examples of current chiropractic practices and small businesses in the healthcare field and apply these concepts through individual and group learning and assessment strategies.

Prerequisites: CHSC 6309 Small Business Creation and Management

3

Geriatrics is the study of older adults and the aging process. As the average age of the population ages, so does the average age of the chiropractic patient. This course covers how aging influences the assessment, diagnosis, and management of health challenges as well as how some of these age-related conditions might be prevented.

Prerequisites: BASC 5304 Public Health, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CLSC 6204 Lab Diagnosis

2

Students may choose from electives that include advanced classes in the core techniques and classes in other techniques. The electives are taught in a hybrid format with the lecture component being delivered on line and the laboratory component delivered face to face and hands on.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique, CHSC 5303 Extra Spinal Analysis & Technique, CHSC 6102 Diversified II Technique, CHSC 6101 Gonstead Technique, CHSC 6206 Thompson Technique, CHSC 6205 Activator I Technique

2

This lab is continuation of the core courses of Diversified and Gonstead which make up the foundation of the osseous adjustive techniques of our profession. This lab only course is designed for skill building toward mastery. Varying techniques will be explored along with alternates in patient positioning, doctor positioning, different contact points, variable approach to segmental contact points, contributions from the indifferent hand, combined lined of drive (coupling), and different types of force generation. This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research, and service.

Prerequisites: CHSC 6308 Full Spine Adjusting II

1

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the student a sound foundation in handling emergency situations in public settings as well as private practice. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge and proficiency in CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation), application and use of an AED (automated external defibrillator), use of emergency oxygen and the management of soft tissue, musculoskeletal and spinal injuries, shock, heart attacks, strokes, and common medical emergencies including seizures, diabetic emergencies and heat and cold emergencies. The main body of information will be presented in a lecture format with hands on directed labs.

Prerequisites: BASC 5303 Physiology II, BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II

4

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Wellness requires active patient participation. It is a process of achieving the best health possible given one’s genetic makeup by pursuing an optimal level of function. This course is designed to address the internal and external environmental risk factors that contribute most significantly to wellness. The course stresses the health of the whole person: physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual. Topics include stress management, diet, exercise, relaxation, disease prevention, and health risks.

Prerequisites: BASC 5304 Public Health, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CLSC 6204 Lab Diagnosis

3

This course is a dynamic, interactive, and clinically challenging course which will transition the learner into real world practice. This course will address the more common conditions that a chiropractor will see in practice. Differential diagnosis, clinical decision making, outcome measures, and case scenarios will be the core focus of this course. Integration of physical, orthopedic, and neurologic examination techniques will be presented as clinically relevant. The student will be directed in the “best practices” management of clinical cases as most suggested by the peer-reviewed literature and evidenced based standards. Evaluation and procedural coding scenarios will be presented where prudent and applicable.

Prerequisites: CLSC 6305 Differential Diagnosis

5

This course concentrates on the skills and knowledge required to properly perform an optimal radiographic examination. In the lab, emphasis will be placed on patient positioning and protection, technique calculations, and instrument operation. The lecture will focus on determining the need for x- rays, informed consent procedures, using the supertech calculator, generating a radiographic report, referring for additional imaging and professional communication with specialists in radiology and other disciplines.

Prerequisites: CLSC 6104 Diagnostic Imaging II

2

Trimester 8:

16 Total credit hours

credit hours

In this course, interns will demonstrate mastery of recovery care skills in patient history, examination, and treatment planning and application via Parker patients and case-based scenarios in lumbo-pelvic-hip complex, cross syndromes, knee, ankle, and shoulder topics.
Prerequisite(s): All academic courses from trimesters 1 – 7

16

Trimester 9:

16 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course teaches interns to render patient care to the public for recovery, supportive, and wellness needs in preparation for experience with increased patient case complexity during Internship Practicum III.

Prerequisites: CLIN 7203 Internship Practicum I (IP I)

16

Trimester 10:

16 Total credit hours

credit hours

Internship Practicum III is a continuation of Internship Practicum I and II and is the culmination of the intern’s clinical experience. Interns are exposed to business practices to help prepare them to successfully plan and operate their own clinic. The intern is required to meet all clinic competencies in order to graduate from the Doctor of Chiropractic Program. Interns may voluntarily apply for selection to participate in the Community Based Internship Program. This program introduces them to chiropractic practices in the field, Jamaica, Spain, and the Veterans Administration.

Prerequisites: CLIN 7203 Internship Practicum I (IP I), CLIN 7303 Internship Practicum II (IP II)

16