Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness (concurrent DC)

General Education Courses:

38 Total credit hours

credit hours

Choose from: English Comp., Speech, Modern Language Communication Skills, or Other

Please speak to an advisor for additional information.

6

Choose from: Liberal Arts (above Freshmen level), Literature, Creative Writing, or Other

3

Choose from: Art, Dance, Music, Theatre, or Other

3

Choose from: American History, Texas History, or Other

Must take at least 3 credits hours of American History

6

Choose from: Psychology, Human Growth & Development, Sociology, or Other

3

Choose from: Finite Math, Statistics, Calculus, or Other

6

Choose from: Biology I, Biology II, Gen Chemistry I, Gen Chemistry II, Organic Chemistry I, Organic Chemistry II, Physics I, or Physics II, Kinesiology, Biomechanics, or Exercise Physiology

8

Choose from: Computer Applications, Computer Science, Management Information Systems, or Other

3

Foundation Courses:

30 Total credit hours

credit hours

This course is an introduction to Biology. Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

The diversity and classification of life will be studied, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will be given to cell biology, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals.
Prerequisite(s): None

3

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 1311 General Chemistry I Lecture and
1111 General Chemistry I Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): High School Algebra or equivalent academic preparation

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 1312 General Chemistry II Lecture and
1112 General Chemistry II Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I (Lecture and Laboratory) or equivalent

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of CHEM 2323 (lecture) and CHEM 2123
(lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1412 General Chemistry II (Lecture and Laboratory)

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of CHEM 2325 (lecture) and CHEM 2125
(lab), including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2423 Organic Chemistry (Lecture and Laboratory)

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of PHYS 2325 University Physics I Lecture
and PHYS 2125 University Physics I Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 1316 Trigonometry or equivalent

4

This lecture and lab course should combine all of the elements of 2326 University Physics II Lecture and
2126 University Physics II Lab, including the learning outcomes listed for both courses.
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2425 Physics I

4

Courses in Doctor of Chiropractic Program - Major:

30 Total credit hours

credit hours

Clinical Psychology has three main areas or purposes. The first is learning to use psychological principles in dealing with patients. Crisis intervention, communication skills training, stress reduction and pain management are among the principles included. The second is the recognition of psycho-pathological conditions in order to help the intern with treatment planning and referral. Thirdly, the intern will better understand the influence of the mind/thoughts/emotions on physical health.

Prerequisites: CHSC 5103 Foundations of Chiropractic, CHSC 5104 Introduction to Clinical Reasoning

3

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the student a sound educational foundation in the issues of public health topics. It is a two credit hour course. The core curriculum consists of the basic public health topics: historical perspective of public health, public health organizations their purpose, structure and functions, social and behavioral factors affecting public health, injuries as a community health problem, safety and health in the workplace, environmental factors in disease transmission and inhibition of disease, epidemiology, food microbiology and aquatic microbiology.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I, BASC 5205 Microbiology/Immunology

2

Basic physiological principles that apply to normal body function will be explored by an in-depth examination of the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms. In this part of the physiology sequence, the physiological mechanisms that regulate the renal, digestive, and endocrine, systems, as well as exercise, acid-base and temperature regulation are covered in part of the physiology sequence. It is important to realize that students will learn better if they know the relation of this course to the curriculum to other courses and disciplines. The course will prepare the student for a number of courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic including, General and Systems Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis. The material covered in this course comprises approximately 50% of Part I boards.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I

5

This course is an introduction to the science of Pathology. The basic principles of pathology will be presented with an emphasis on understanding the mechanism of development of the disease process. The general cellular and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of disease will be introduced, with an emphasis on the fact that the pathological process is not a new entity but a misapplication of the normal processes already encountered.

Prerequisites: BASC 5204 Physiology I, BASC 5205 Microbiology/Immunology, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

3

This course presents the principles and practice of scientifically based clinical nutrition. Topics discussed include assessment of nutritional status considering nutritional implications of the physical exam, laboratory studies, and more). Topics include macronutrients, micronutrients, phytonutrients, enzymes, antioxidants and other nutrients. Various conditions are discussed with emphasis on understanding that they are different expressions of imbalances and/or dysfunction that are preventable and correctable in many cases. Emphasis is on those conditions likely to be seen in the chiropractic practice that will respond to nutritional intervention thereby increasing the health and wellness of the patients.

Prerequisites: BASC 5303 Physiology II, BASC 5206 Biochemistry II, BASC 5306 General Pathology

4

Ob-Gyn course introduces the basic concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions specific to the female patient. The course examines the anatomical and physiological process occurring in pregnancy and childbirth as they are clinically relevant to the practicing chiropractor. Adjusting for the pregnant female will also be discussed. Pediatrics is a primary course in the diagnosis and treatment of physical and psychosocial conditions unique to infants and children. Information on examination and chiropractic adjusting procedures will be discussed.

Prerequisites: BASC 5304 Public Health, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CHSC 5302 Diversified I Technique

4

Geriatrics is the study of older adults and the aging process. As the average age of the population ages, so does the average age of the chiropractic patient. This course covers how aging influences the assessment, diagnosis, and management of health challenges as well as how some of these age-related conditions might be prevented.

Prerequisites: BASC 5304 Public Health, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CLSC 6204 Lab Diagnosis

2

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the student a sound foundation in handling emergency situations in public settings as well as private practice. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge and proficiency in CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation), application and use of an AED (automated external defibrillator), use of emergency oxygen and the management of soft tissue, musculoskeletal and spinal injuries, shock, heart attacks, strokes, and common medical emergencies including seizures, diabetic emergencies and heat and cold emergencies. The main body of information will be presented in a lecture format with hands on directed labs.

Prerequisites: BASC 5303 Physiology II, BASC 5301 Gross Anatomy II

4

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Wellness requires active patient participation. It is a process of achieving the best health possible given one’s genetic makeup by pursuing an optimal level of function. This course is designed to address the internal and external environmental risk factors that contribute most significantly to wellness. The course stresses the health of the whole person: physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual. Topics include stress management, diet, exercise, relaxation, disease prevention, and health risks.

Prerequisites: BASC 5304 Public Health, BASC 6106 Systems Pathology, CLSC 6103 Physical Diagnosis, CLSC 6204 Lab Diagnosis

3

Courses in Doctor of Chiropractic Program - Minor:

25 Total credit hours

credit hours

Biology of Cells and Tissues supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to provide the student a sound foundation in the way cellular components of different organ systems are combined to produce coordinated function. The course requires the students to develop conceptual skills to visualize the functions of individual components and coordinate them with the overall function of an organ. The course presents the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues organs and organ systems in the human body and correlates these structures with their various functions. The unity of the human body is examined beginning first at the cellular level with a study of the basic life processes of cells including cell structure and function. Emphasis is given to growth, maintenance, energetics, and membrane transport, as well as to how information that is used to run the cell is stored and expressed. Secondly, the manner in which different kinds of cells and their products are organized into the basic tissues are examined, and thirdly the organization of tissues within the various organs and organ systems are studied with an emphasis on the inter-relationship between the structure and function of tissues. At each step, emphasis is placed on the necessity of proper function of each component to the well-being of the whole. Reference is made to the impact of lifestyle choices (diet, activity, etc.) on the structure and function of individual components. The course consists of both lecture and laboratory sessions. In the lecture information is presented in sufficient depth and sufficient detail to support basic working concepts of structure and function. The laboratory sessions are used to help the student visualize the concepts obtained from the lectures or assigned readings and to help them apply the information obtained from these sources. This course provides a foundation for the study of biochemistry and physiology as well as illustrating the cellular organization of systems studied in anatomy.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

4

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic, by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. This course is designed to give the freshman student a sound educational foundation in human embryology and anatomy using a systems approach and will be presented in a lecture/lab format. The course requires that student’s research outside sources to gain insight into the concepts presented. The course will introduce embryological and anatomical concepts whose understanding is absolutely essential to continuing on in gross anatomy and to become a successful Chiropractor. Each section in anatomy is preceded by the embryological development of that area or system. Areas of emphasis include anatomic terminology, fertilization and implantation, embryological development, osteology, arthrology, myology, neurology and the cardiovascular system. Students are encouraged to help each other in class during the “stop and reflect” sessions which promote the concepts of service and group interaction. The main body of information will be presented in a lecture format supported by self-paced labs using models and student partners to emphasize the anatomical features and topographical land marks.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in Trimester I at Parker University, College of Chiropractic

5

Basic physiological principles that apply to normal body function will be explored by an in-depth examination of the underlying chemical and physical mechanisms. In this part of the physiology sequence, skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle anatomy, excitation – contraction coupling, mechanical function, and

233

fiber types, and function are covered. In addition, the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems are covered in part of the physiology sequence. It is important to realize that students will learn better if they know the relation of this course to the curriculum to other courses and disciplines. The course will prepare the student for a number of courses at Parker University, College of Chiropractic, including Physiology II, General and Systems Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Lab Diagnosis, and Differential Diagnosis. The material covered in this course comprises approximately 50% of Part I boards and also is a component of Part II boards.

Prerequisites: BASC 5101 Biology of Cells and Tissues, BASC 5104 Developmental and Applied Anatomy

5

This course supports the mission statement of Parker University, College of Chiropractic by helping to create leaders who promote Chiropractic wellness through high standards of education, research and service. Microbiology is a six credit hour lecture/laboratory course. Microbiology is the study of microorganisms further defined as the branch of biology focused on microorganisms and the effects they have on other living organisms. Microorganisms include bacteria, fungi, viruses, rickettsia, protozoa, and helminthes. Topics include growth, reproduction, nutrition, genetics, infectious processes, defense mechanisms, immunology, and control of microorganisms, emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and development of resistance to antimicrobial chemicals. Laboratory exercises develop fundamental skills in aseptic technique, microscopy, pure culture study, and the isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

Prerequisites: BASC 5101 Biology of Cells and Tissues

6

This course is a continuation into the basic principles of pathology as covered in General Pathology. Presentations will include an in-depth discussion into multiple organ systems pathology, with an emphasis on understanding the origins of the pathophysiological disease state. An understanding of the initial factors in the early development of organ dysfunction will lead to a more appropriate intervention by the future health care provider. A philosophical discussion of the benefits of preventive care as it relates to a wellness lifestyle will also be included where appropriate.

Prerequisites: BASC 5306 General Pathology

5